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3D Printing: World's First 3D Printed Supercar Is Named Blade

First Posted: Jun 29, 2015 10:47 AM EDT
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3D printing technology is not exactly new. Some of this technological magic first appeared in the late 1980s and was referred to as Rapid Prototyping (PR) technologies. And since it's starts, 3D printing has come up with everything from inanimate objects to organs. Yet now, we can add spectacular automobiles to the list, too.

The world's first 3D printed supercar is now available. The prototype, named Blade, was designed and manufactured by Divergent Microfactories, a U.S. start-up company. It holds twice the power-to-weight ratio of a Bugatti Veyron, significantly less weight than 90 percent of cars at 1,400lbs and 30 percent of an electric car along with 1/50th the factory capital costs of other manufactured cars, the ability to go from 0-60 mph in just over two seconds and a 700hp engine that can use compressed natural gas or petrol, according to Science Recorder.

Blade was also created with a unique technology known as "a Node," according to manufacturers; this involves a 3D printed aluminum joint that connects pieces of carbon fiber tubing to help create the chassis, otherwise known as the frame for the automobile's "running gear," including the engine, drive shaft, transmission and suspension.

"Society has made great strides in its awareness and adoption of cleaner and greener cars. The problem is that while these cars do now exist, the actual manufacturing of them is anything but environmentally friendly," says Divergent Microfactories CEO Kevin Czinger, via the Irish Examiner.

"At Divergent Microfactories, we've found a way to make automobiles that holds the promise of radically reducing the resource use and pollution generated by manufacturing."

If all goes according to plan, Divergent Microfactories said they hope to make 10,000 3D-printed chassis annually, according to the Monitor Daily. However, they'll need help from partners who are willing to invest.

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