Updated Hot Tags Health Human Evolution Climate Change Animals

Experience us with dark theme

sciencewr.com
Protecting Ecosystems by Measuring Natural Capital From Space

Protecting Ecosystems by Measuring Natural Capital From Space

  • Text Size - +
  • Print
  • E-mail
First Posted: Jul 18, 2013 06:17 PM EDT

Satellites show how we can promote economic development in an environmentally sustainable manner by putting a price on nature’s resources.

Located on the Indonesian island of Lombok, the Mount Rinjani National Park is an important ecosystem for numerous endangered plants and animals. Just outside the park’s boundaries, the fertile soils are exploited for agriculture and much of the forest has been cleared away for farmland.

Like Us on Facebook

These farms are of great importance to the local economy, but deforestation has gravely affected water availability over the last decade. While the farms may contribute to an economic profit, the troubles experienced by upstream communities – and the island as a whole – likely cause a deficit.

In many cases, a natural ecosystem’s economic value outweighs the potential economic gain by destroying it. How? In the Lombok example, the forest provides water security and filtration, is a natural carbon store, protects against soil erosion and has the potential for ecotourism.

Spacecraft captures swath of destruction from deadly tornado.
(Photo : NASA/GSFC/METI/ERSDAC/JAROS, and U.S./Japan ASTER Science Team)
Spacecraft captures swath of destruction from deadly tornado.
Putting a price on these features is one way to find out if keeping the forest is more profitable than destroying it for farming.

Satellites are being used to create digital elevation models of Mount Rinjani, as well as land use and land cover maps to support hydrological calculations and classify forests. Estimates of forest volume and density help to calculate carbon sequestration. These efforts help in assessing the value of Lombok’s forest resource.

This concept of ‘natural capital accounting’ – also known as Ecosystems Service Assessments – can also be applied to wetlands, deserts, rangelands, grasslands and coastal areas. All of our natural reserves provide valuable assets to society in terms of measurable and accountable services.

ESA is already a world leader in environmental monitoring through numerous programmes and initiatives in climate variability and risk assessments, coastal monitoring, global wetlands monitoring, mapping of biodiversity, assessments of renewable energies, water management and certification of sustainable forest management.

Working with a consortium of experts from five specialist Earth observation service companies, ESA is now increasing its efforts in Ecosystems Service Assessments. Following initiatives by the European Environment Agency and the Joint Research Centre, ESA is improving its capacity to measure natural capital around the world using satellite data to promote sustainable development.

Demonstration trials include coastal reef and sea grass studies in Australia and Yucatan, Mexico, to investigate the economic value of the reefs’ coastal protection abilities and fish habitats.

Other trials value forest carbon storage, water purification, soil retention and nutrient cycling capabilities linked to sustainable forest management practices in Vietnam, Peru and Lombok.

The aim is to derive the economic value of the specific ecosystems addressed in each area for a selected group of users whose natural resources are threatened by industrialisation and bad land use management. -- ESA

©2014 ScienceWorldReport.com All rights reserved. Do not reproduce without permission. The window to the world of science news.

Around the web

Join the Conversation

Space News

Health & Medicine News

Environment News

Stay
Connected
Subscribe to our newsletter

Real Time Analytics