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Tech Facebook Ruins New Relationships: Study

Facebook Ruins New Relationships: Study

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First Posted: Jun 07, 2013 10:42 AM EDT
Facebook Ruins New Relationships: Study
Those who use Facebook often are more likely to experience Facebook-linked conflict with their romantic partners and may have a negative outcome on the relationship, including emotional and physical cheating, breakup and divorce. (Photo : Flickr.com/rutty)

Facebook and other social networking sites used for networking and connecting is a good way of staying in touch with family and friends. However, if you are in a new relationship, you might want to stay far from this networking site, as a new study states that Facebook ruins new relationships.

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A recent study conducted by Russell Clayton, a doctoral student in the University of Missouri School of Journalism, found that Facebook use can be damaging to the user's romantic relationships. He noticed that those who use Facebook often are more likely to experience Facebook-linked conflict with their romantic partners and may have a negative outcome on the relationship, including emotional and physical cheating, breakup and divorce, according to a news release.

The study was conducted in collaboration with Alexander Nagurney, an instructor at the University of Hawaii at Hilo, and Jessica R. Smith, a doctoral student at St. Mary's University in San Antonio.

To proceed with their study, researchers surveyed Facebook users who were between the age group 18-32. The participants were asked about the frequency at which they used Facebook, and whether any Facebook-related conflict occurred between their current or former partner.

They noticed that extreme use of the social networking site among couples predicted Facebook-related conflicts, which then predicted negative relationship outcomes such as cheating, breakup and divorce.

"Previous research has shown that the more a person in a romantic relationship uses Facebook, the more likely they are to monitor their partner's Facebook activity more stringently, which can lead to feelings of jealousy," Clayton said. "Facebook-induced jealousy may lead to arguments concerning past partners. Also, our study found that excessive Facebook users are more likely to connect or reconnect with other Facebook users, including previous partners, which may lead to emotional and physical cheating."

This trend was more visible in those who had a new relationship.

These findings are assumed for couples who had been in a relation for around three years or less. This study highlights the fact that Facebook is a threat to relationships that are not matured. Those who have been in a relationship for more than three years may not be addicted to Facebook and may have a matured relationship, in which case Facebook is not a threat to them.

The only solution is to limit the use of Facebook.

The study will be published in the Journal Cyberpsychology, Behavior and Social Networking

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