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Mysterious-Looking Linear Patterns Etched On Ice Sheet Of A Lake In Iceland

First Posted: Mar 20, 2017 04:52 AM EDT
Iceland Locals Are Baffled By A 1.25 Mile Geometric Pattern Across Their Largest Lake
A strange-looking geometric patterns have appeared on Lake Thingvallavatn in Iceland believed to be a rare phenomenon called "finger rafting."
(Photo : ModernGalaxy/YouTube screenshot)

Strange and eerie-looking patterns have appeared on the ice sheet of Lake Thingvallavatn in Iceland. The zigzag pattern is about 2 km (4.2 miles) that stretches along the ice. The residents were puzzled by the appearance of this weird pattern and speculated theories from alien activity to sea monsters.

The phenomenon has never been seen before on the frozen lake. Einar AE Saemundsen, the park official, said that the striking linear patterns had not appeared in the same region as the other cracks in the ice. He further said that theories began to formulate, and there was no lack of other explanations from alien activity and unknown monsters in the lake to bizarre theories.

So, what are these strange linear patterns that imprinted on the said frozen lake? Experts believed that the patterns are the result of a rare phenomenon known as "finger rafting." This transpires when two sheets of ice on a water push over and under each other alternately, in which it produces the so-called "fingers." The patterns would likely happen when both sheets of ice are of equal thickness, according to RT.

Meanwhile, a study published in Physical Review Letters was conducted by researchers from Yale to determine how this phenomenon would occur. The researchers explained that using thin sheets of sealing wax floating on water, the finger rafting occurs when pushing two sheets to interact along their long edging. They further explained that the experimental fingers have the powerful straight-lined characteristics and display a feature finger width. The team thinks that because ice has naturally ragged edges when two sheets interact, the unbalanced edges could either move below or above the other, as noted by Science Alert.

The experts, therefore, concluded that this is a very rare phenomenon referred to as finger rafting. On the other hand, this explanation seems to be not noteworthy for the locals. Saemundsen said that this is not known to have ever been seen before at the frozen lake.

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