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Nature & Environment Pictures Taken From Space Show Smog Over Beijing

Pictures Taken From Space Show Smog Over Beijing

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First Posted: Jan 15, 2013 06:05 PM EST
Beijing smog from space
At the time that this Jan. 14 image was taken by satellite, ground-based sensors at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing reported PM2.5 measurements of 291 micrograms per cubic meter of air. (Photo : NASA)

The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Terra satellite acquired these natural-color images of northeastern China on January 14 (top) and January 3, 2013. The top image shows extensive haze, low clouds, and fog over the region. The white areas are mostly clouds or fog, but still with a tinge of gray or yellow from the air pollution. Other cloud-free areas have a pall of gray and brown smog that mostly blots out the cities below. In areas where the ground is visible, some of the landscape is covered with lingering snow from storms in recent weeks. (Snow is more prominent in the January 3 image.)

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Residents not just in Beijing but also many other cities in China were warned to stay inside in mid-January 2013 as the nation faced one of the worst periods of air quality in recent history. The Chinese government ordered factories to scale back emissions, while hospitals saw spikes of more than 20 to 30 percent in patients complaining of respiratory issues, according to news reports.

At the time that this Jan. 14 image was taken by satellite, ground-based sensors at the U.S. Embassy in Beijing reported PM2.5 measurements of 291 micrograms per cubic meter of air. Fine, airborne particulate matter (PM) that is smaller than 2.5 microns (about one thirtieth the width of a human hair) is considered dangerous because it is small enough to enter the passages of the human lungs. Most PM2.5 aerosol particles come from the burning of fossil fuels and biomass (wood fires and agricultural burning). The World Health Organization considers PM2.5 to be safe when it is below 25.

The smog situation wasn|t as series 10 dazs earlier, on Januarz 3, but also not great. The picture below is also good for comparison, since there are no clouds:

China beijing snow from space
(Photo : NASA)
In areas where the ground is visible, some of the landscape is covered with lingering snow from storms in recent weeks, which is more prominent in this image from January 3.

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