Health & Medicine

New Study Links Long-Term Exposure To Aircraft Noise To High Blood Pressure

Tabitha Shiflett
First Posted: Jun 22, 2017 04:33 PM EDT
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Living within reach of an airport may be convenient, but new studies show it could also lead to high blood pressure.

According to a new study published in the online journal Occupational & Environmental Medicine, aircraft noise (particularly nighttime noise) is linked to an increased risk of high blood pressure and stroke.

The study was based on data from 420 people living near Athens International Airport in Greece, where more than 600 planes take off and land daily.

Approximately 49 percent of study participants were exposed to more than 55 dB of daytime aircraft noise, while 27 percent were exposed to more than 45 dB of nighttime aircraft noise.

The study resulted in 71 participants being diagnosed with high blood pressure, while 44 were diagnosed with cardiac arrhythmia (heart flutter). Another 18 participants had a heart attack. These results were derived from data collected between 2004 -- 2006 and 2013.

What Is High Blood Pressure?

According to the American Heart Association, more than 85 million Americans have high blood pressure (HBP). HBP is described as a "silent killer." This is because most patients experience little to no symptoms at all. A variety of symptoms could be indirectly related to HBP, including blood spots in the eyes, dizziness, and facial flushing. It should be noted, however, that these symptoms are not always caused by HBP. If you feel you're struggling with HBP, contact a health professional immediately.

Factors such as your family history, gender, age, and race can affect your chances of being diagnosed with HBP. In addition, lifestyle choices such as a lack of physical activity, an unhealthy diet, being overweight, or drinking too much alcohol can increase your chances of getting HBP.

A variety of symptoms could be indirectly related to HBP, including blood spots in the eyes, dizziness, and facial flushing. It should be noted, however, that these symptoms are not always caused by HBP. If you feel you're struggling with HBP, contact a health professional immediately. 

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